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Cell cycle control | Regulation of cell cycle 1
 
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This is the first cell cycle control video lecture that explains the regulation of cell cycle by involving cyclin is an CDK proteins. This lecture provides a brief idea about the cell cycle regulation process during the mitosis cell division. For more information, log on to- http://www.shomusbiology.com/ Get Shomu's Biology DVD set here- http://www.shomusbiology.com/dvd-store/ Download the study materials here- http://shomusbiology.com/bio-materials.html
Views: 79633 Shomu's Biology
The Cell Cycle and its Regulation
 
12:40
Your cells have to divide when you're growing, to heal wounds, and to replace dead cells. But how do cells know when to divide and when not to divide? We can't have cells just growing willy-nilly! That's what cancer is, and that's bad. Luckily, cells obey something called the cell cycle, which is regulated by a variety of signaling molecules, which tell the cell when to divide and when to chill out. Let's look at the phases of this cycle and some of its regulatory mechanisms now. Subscribe: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveSubscribe [email protected] http://patreon.com/ProfessorDaveExplains http://professordaveexplains.com http://facebook.com/ProfessorDaveExpl... http://twitter.com/DaveExplains Biology Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveBio Biochemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveBiochem General Chemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveGenChem Organic Chemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveOrgChem Classical Physics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDavePhysics1 Modern Physics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDavePhysics2 Mathematics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveMaths American History Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveAmericanHistory
Cell Cycle Regulation
 
03:04
Cell Cycle Regulation cell cycle regulation of g-quadruplex dna structures at telomeres, drug rehabilitation centers in ocala florida, free drug rehabilitation centers in orlando florida, cell cycle regulation worksheet answer key
Views: 39044 Maria C. Edwards
Cell cycle control | Cells | MCAT | Khan Academy
 
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Learn about the different "seasons" of a cell's life and how it grows with time. By Raja Narayan. Visit us (http://www.khanacademy.org/science/healthcare-and-medicine) for health and medicine content or (http://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/mcat) for MCAT related content. These videos do not provide medical advice and are for informational purposes only. The videos are not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of a qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read or seen in any Khan Academy video. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/mcat/cells/cellular-division/v/loss-of-cell-cycle-control-in-cancer?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=mcat Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/mcat/cells/cellular-division/v/cell-cycle-phases?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=mcat MCAT on Khan Academy: Go ahead and practice some passage-based questions! About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s MCAT channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDkK5wqSuwDlJ3_nl3rgdiQ?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 239486 khanacademymedicine
Cyclin and cyclin dependent kinases (cdk) | Cell cycle regulation lecture 3
 
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cyclin cdk cell cycle - The third lecture on cell cycle regulation explains the role of cyclin and cyclin dependent kinase proteins in cell cycle control. This video shows how cyclin partners help in the progression of cell cycle during mitosis cell division. It shows the example of the mitotic cyclin activation and production of MPF. For more information, log on to- http://www.shomusbiology.com/ Get Shomu's Biology DVD set here- http://www.shomusbiology.com/dvd-store/ Download the study materials here- http://shomusbiology.com/bio-materials.html
Views: 111538 Shomu's Biology
Molecular Biology | Cell Cycle Regulation
 
39:36
Ninja Nerds, Join us for this video where we continue our discussion on the cell cycle, and now talk about the mechanisms that are controlling the progression of a cell during cell cycle regulation. ***PLEASE SUPPORT US*** PATREON | https://www.patreon.com/NinjaNerdScience ***EVERY DOLLAR HELPS US GROW & IMPROVE OUR QUALITY*** FACEBOOK | https://www.facebook.com/NinjaNerdScience INSTAGRAM | https://www.instagram.com/ninjanerdscience/ ✎ For general inquiries email us at: [email protected]
Views: 3659 Ninja Nerd Science
Cell cycle checkpoints and regulation - Usmle quick review
 
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Cell cycle Cell cycle has 3 states (quiescent, interphase, mitosis), 5 phases (G0, G1, S, G2, M): Quiescent/senescent state: G0 phase. Examples: neurons, cardiac muscle, RBCs Interphase state: G1, S, and G2 phases M (Mitosis) state: M phase — PMAT (prophase, metaphase, anaphase, telophase) occur during this phase. 3 major cell cycle checkpoints: 1. The end of G1 2. The end of G2 3. During metaphase of M
Views: 39738 Dr.G.Bhanu Prakash
Cell Cycle Checkpoints | Cell cycle regulation 2
 
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This lecture on cell cycle regulation explains about the cell cycle checkpoints and the role of cell cycle checkpoints in controlling cell cycle. It also explains the link between cell cycle checkpoints and cancer. Cell cycle checkpoints are specific time points during cell cycle when the cell decides whether to continue with the cell division or not. Learn more about cell cycle control in this video. For more information, log on to- http://www.shomusbiology.com/ Get Shomu's Biology DVD set here- http://www.shomusbiology.com/dvd-store/ Download the study materials here- http://shomusbiology.com/bio-materials.html
Views: 62115 Shomu's Biology
Loss of cell cycle control in cancer | Cells | MCAT | Khan Academy
 
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Learn about the different "seasons" of a cell's life and how it grows with time. By Raja Narayan. Visit us (http://www.khanacademy.org/science/healthcare-and-medicine) for health and medicine content or (http://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/mcat) for MCAT related content. These videos do not provide medical advice and are for informational purposes only. The videos are not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of a qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read or seen in any Khan Academy video. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/mcat/cells/cellular-division/v/fertilization-haploid-diploid-gamete-zygote-homologous?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=mcat Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/mcat/cells/cellular-division/v/cell-cycle-control?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=mcat MCAT on Khan Academy: Go ahead and practice some passage-based questions! About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s MCAT channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDkK5wqSuwDlJ3_nl3rgdiQ?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 88155 khanacademymedicine
CDKs, cyclines, cell cycle
 
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This cell cycle regulation lecture explains about the role of CDK and cyclines in cell cycle. http://shomusbiology.com/ Download the study materials here- http://shomusbiology.com/bio-materials.html Cyclins were originally named because their concentration varies in a cyclical fashion during the cell cycle. (Note that the cyclins are now classified according to their conserved cyclin box structure, and not all these cyclins alter in level through the cell cycle.[2]) The oscillations of the cyclins, namely fluctuations in cyclin gene expression and destruction by the ubiquitin mediated proteasome pathway, induce oscillations in Cdk activity to drive the cell cycle. A cyclin forms a complex with Cdk, which begins to activate the Cdk, but the complete activation requires phosphorylation, as well. Complex formation results in activation of the Cdk active site. Cyclins themselves have no enzymatic activity but have binding sites for some substrates and target the Cdks to specific subcellular locations.[3] They were discovered by R. Timothy Hunt in 1982 while studying the cell cycle of sea urchins.[4][5] In an interview for the BBC4 documentary "The Life Scientific" (aired on 13/12/2011) hosted by Jim Al-Khalili, R. Timothy Hunt explained that the name "cyclin" was originally named after his hobby cycling. It was only after the naming did its importance in the cell cycle become apparent. As it was appropriate the name stuck.[6] R.Timothy Hunt: "By the way the name cyclin, which I coined, was really a joke, it's because I like cycling so much at the time but they did come and go in the cell..." [7] Cyclins, when bound with the dependent kinases, such as the p34 (cdc2) or cdk1 proteins, form the maturation-promoting factor. MPFs activate other proteins through phosphorylation. These phosphorylated proteins, in turn, are responsible for specific events during cycle division such as microtubule formation and chromatin remodeling. Cyclins can be divided into four classes based on their behavior in the cell cycle of vertebrate somatic cells and yeast cells: G1/S cyclins, S cyclins, M cyclins, G1 cyclins. This division is useful when talking about most cell cycles, but it is not universal as some cyclins have different functions or timing in different cell types. G1/S Cyclins rise in late G1 and fall in early S phase. The Cdk- G1/S cyclin complex begins to induce the initial processes of DNA replication, primarily by arresting systems that prevent S phase Cdk activity in G1. The cyclins also promote other activities to progress the cell cycle, like centrosome duplication in vertebrates or spindle pole body in yeast. The rise in presence of G1/S cyclins is paralleled by a rise in S cyclins. S cyclins bind to Cdk and the complex directly induces DNA replication. The levels of S cyclins remain high, not only throughout S phase, but through G2 and early mitosis as well to promote early events in mitosis. M cyclin concentrations rise as the cell begins to enter mitosis and the concentrations peak at metaphase. Cell changes in the cell cycle like the assembly of mitotic spindles and alignment of sister-chromatids along the spindles are induced by M cyclin- Cdk complexes. The destruction of M cyclins during metaphase and anaphase, after the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint is satisfied, causes the exit of mitosis and cytokinesis.[8] G1 cyclins do not behave like the other cyclins, in that the concentrations increase gradually (with no oscillation), throughout the cell cycle based on cell growth and the external growth-regulatory signals. The presence of G cyclins coordinate cell growth with the entry to a new cell cycle. Source of the article published in description is Wikipedia. I am sharing their material. © by original content developers of Wikipedia. Link- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page Animation source: Discover Biology, Core 3rd Edition, W W Norton and company Link- http://www.wwnorton.com/college/biology/discoverbio3/core/content/index/animations.asp References- The cell: A molecular approach, fifth edition Geoffery M. Cooper and Robert E. Housman © ASM press and Sinauer Asociates, Inc.
Views: 157970 Shomu's Biology
Cell Cycle Regulation and Cancer
 
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A brief review of Mitosis using photos and descriptors begins this lesson. After the review, we move into a discussion about Cyclin proteins, CDKs, and checkpoints that regulate the progression through the Cell Cycle. When things don't go as planned, cancer can develop. Carcinogens are discussed. We end by defining the term apoptosis.
Views: 20389 Ellen Howell
Cell Cycle & Cell Division - Cell Cycle - Part 1
 
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Cell cycle includes preparatory phase and a division phase. The phases inter phase and M phase. To help students search for a topic easily, all the channel videos have been archived chapter wise on www.onlinenbt.com The study notes are available on Amazon India. The related affiliate links are provided below Human Physiology - http://amzn.to/2DA46ea Plant Physiology - http://amzn.to/2EZR5HS Biotechnology - http://amzn.to/2EZyqf9 Free Delivery (On Selected Pin codes) !!!, Cash on Delivery Available!!! Follow us on Twitter to get your doubts/questions solved and be updated on NOTES!!! https://twitter.com/neelabakore
Views: 132893 Neela Bakore Tutorials
Mitosis: Splitting Up is Complicated - Crash Course Biology #12
 
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Hank describes mitosis and cytokinesis - the series of processes our cells go through to divide into two identical copies. Crash Course Biology is now available on DVD! http://dftba.com/product/1av/CrashCourse-Biology-The-Complete-Series-DVD-Set Like CrashCourse on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/youtubecrashcourse Follow CrashCourse on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/thecrashcourse References for this video can be found in the Google document here: http://dft.ba/-2rVV Table of Contents 1. Mitosis 0:24 2. Interphase 3:27 a) Chromatin 3:37 b) Centrosomes 3:52 3) Prophase 4:14 a) Chromosomes 4:18 b) Chromatid 4:31 c) Microtubules 5:07 4) Metaphase 5:22 a) Motor Proteins 5:36 5) Biolography 6:13 6) Anaphase 9:00 7) Telophase 9:15 8) Cleavage 9:25 9) Cytokinesis 9:36 This video contains the following sounds from Freesound.org: "Swishes.wav" by Pogotron "Opening Scotch Whisky.mp3" by Percy Duke crashcourse, biology, mitosis, cell biology, cell division, cell, replication, splitting, chromosome, diploid cells, nucleus, DNA, prophase, metaphase, anaphase, telophase, interphase, chromatin, chromatid, centrosome duplication, centromere, microtubules, motor protein, walter flemming, tomomi kiyomitsu, dynein, cleavage, cytokinesis, daughter cells, science, education, college, university, learn, teach, hank green Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 3896312 CrashCourse
Cell cycle phases | Cells | MCAT | Khan Academy
 
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Learn about the different "seasons" of a cell's life and how it grows with time. By Raja Narayan. Visit us (http://www.khanacademy.org/science/healthcare-and-medicine) for health and medicine content or (http://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/mcat) for MCAT related content. These videos do not provide medical advice and are for informational purposes only. The videos are not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of a qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read or seen in any Khan Academy video. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/mcat/cells/cellular-division/v/cell-cycle-control?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=mcat Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/mcat/cells/viruses/v/subviral-particles-viroids-and-prions?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=mcat MCAT on Khan Academy: Go ahead and practice some passage-based questions! About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s MCAT channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDkK5wqSuwDlJ3_nl3rgdiQ?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 477260 khanacademymedicine
Cell cycle regulation
 
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This lecture explains the cell cycle regulation and cell cycle checkpoints. http://shomusbiology.com/ Download the study materials here- http://shomusbiology.com/bio-materials.html Remember Shomu’s Biology is created to spread the knowledge of life science and biology by sharing all this free biology lectures video and animation presented by Suman Bhattacharjee in YouTube. All these tutorials are brought to you for free. Please subscribe to our channel so that we can grow together. You can check for any of the following services from Shomu’s Biology- Buy Shomu’s Biology lecture DVD set- www.shomusbiology.com/dvd-store Shomu’s Biology assignment services – www.shomusbiology.com/assignment -help Join Online coaching for CSIR NET exam – www.shomusbiology.com/net-coaching We are social. Find us on different sites here- Our Website – www.shomusbiology.com Facebook page- https://www.facebook.com/ShomusBiology/ Twitter - https://twitter.com/shomusbiology SlideShare- www.slideshare.net/shomusbiology Google plus- https://plus.google.com/113648584982732129198 LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/suman-bhattacharjee-2a051661 Youtube- https://www.youtube.com/user/TheFunsuman Thank you for watching In this video tutorial, cell cycle regulation and inhibition of cell cycle events are describes in detail and also the role of p53 is demonstrated. Regulation of the cell cycle involves processes crucial to the survival of a cell, including the detection and repair of genetic damage as well as the prevention of uncontrolled cell division. The molecular events that control the cell cycle are ordered and directional; that is, each process occurs in a sequential fashion and it is impossible to "reverse" the cycle. Two key classes of regulatory molecules, cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), determine a cell's progress through the cell cycle.[6] Leland H. Hartwell, R. Timothy Hunt, and Paul M. Nurse won the 2001 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for their discovery of these central molecules.[7] Many of the genes encoding cyclins and CDKs are conserved among all eukaryotes, but in general more complex organisms have more elaborate cell cycle control systems that incorporate more individual components. Many of the relevant genes were first identified by studying yeast, especially Saccharomyces cerevisiae;[8] genetic nomenclature in yeast dubs many of these genes cdc (for "cell division cycle") followed by an identifying number, e.g., cdc25 or cdc20. Cyclins form the regulatory subunits and CDKs the catalytic subunits of an activated heterodimer; cyclins have no catalytic activity and CDKs are inactive in the absence of a partner cyclin. When activated by a bound cyclin, CDKs perform a common biochemical reaction called phosphorylation that activates or inactivates target proteins to orchestrate coordinated entry into the next phase of the cell cycle. Different cyclin-CDK combinations determine the downstream proteins targeted. CDKs are constitutively expressed in cells whereas cyclins are synthesised at specific stages of the cell cycle, in response to various molecular signals.[9] Source of the article published in description is Wikipedia. I am sharing their material. © by original content developers of Wikipedia. Link- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page
Views: 14125 Shomu's Biology
Regulations of cell cycle
 
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3rd lecture of cell cycle and cell division...
Views: 5229 AR Group
Regulation of cell cycle, Cell Biology (B.Sc.& M.Sc. Biotechnology)
 
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Ms. Shweta Singh, Biyani girls college, jaipur, explains about regulation of cell cycle which is a set of macromolecular events, highly coordinated and leads to cell division. It includes interphase and mitosis. Interphase has G1, S,G2 stage and mitosis has prophase, metaphase, anaphase and telophase. It also includes certain checkpoints that arrest cell cycle. www.gurukpo.com, www.biyanicolleges.org
Views: 3220 Guru Kpo
Cell Cycle and Interphase
 
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Donate here: http://www.aklectures.com/donate.php Website video link: http://www.aklectures.com/lecture/cell-cycle-and-interphase Facebook link: https://www.facebook.com/aklectures Website link: http://www.aklectures.com
Views: 46004 AK LECTURES
Cell Cycle (Overview, Interphase)
 
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https://www.facebook.com/ArmandoHasudungan Support me: http://www.patreon.com/armando Instagram: http://instagram.com/armandohasudungan Twitter: https://twitter.com/Armando71021105
Views: 508176 Armando Hasudungan
Cell Cycle Regulation and Cancer
 
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Cancer cells are different than normal cells. Learn the differences in their behavior including: - Cell cycle checkpoints - Chemical signals - Cell communication - Apoptosis
Cell cycle arrest | Cell cycle regulation lecture 4
 
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Cell cycle arrest - This cell cycle regulation lecture that explains about the role of p53 in cell cycle arrest. P53 tumour suppressor gene that helps in cell cycle arrest where there is any DNA damage or the cell undergoing any stress such as UV radiation. Learn more about cell cycle arrest mechanism in this video lecture. For more information, log on to- http://www.shomusbiology.com/ Get Shomu's Biology DVD set here- http://www.shomusbiology.com/dvd-store/ Download the study materials here- http://shomusbiology.com/bio-materials.html
Views: 34888 Shomu's Biology
AP Biology: Cell Cycle Regulation and Cancer
 
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Checkpoints and cancer
Views: 72177 Doc Ron Bio
(OLD VIDEO) The Cell Cycle and Cancer
 
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This video has been redone: https://youtu.be/QVCjdNxJreE Music in this old video used with permission from Adrian Holovaty (http://www.youtube.com/c/adrianholovaty). Support us on Patreon! http://www.patreon.com/amoebasisters Our FREE resources: GIFs: http://www.amoebasisters.com/gifs.html Handouts: http://www.amoebasisters.com/handouts.html Comics: http://www.amoebasisters.com/parameciumparlorcomics Connect with us! Website: http://www.AmoebaSisters.com Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/AmoebaSisters Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/AmoebaSisters Tumblr: http://www.amoebasisters.tumblr.com Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/AmoebaSister­s Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/amoebasistersofficial/ Visit our Redbubble store at http://www.amoebasisters.com/store.html The Amoeba Sisters videos demystify science with humor and relevance. The videos center on Pinky's certification and experience in teaching science at the high school level. Pinky's teacher certification is in grades 4-8 science and 8-12 composite science (encompassing biology, chemistry, and physics). Amoeba Sisters videos only cover concepts that Pinky is certified to teach, and they focus on her specialty: secondary life science. For more information about The Amoeba Sisters, visit: http://www.amoebasisters.com/about-us.html We cover the basics in biology concepts at the secondary level. If you are looking to discover more about biology and go into depth beyond these basics, our recommended reference is the FREE, peer reviewed, open source OpenStax biology textbook: https://openstax.org/details/books/biology We take pride in our AWESOME community, and we welcome feedback and discussion. However, please remember that this is an education channel. See YouTube's community guidelines https://www.youtube.com/yt/policyandsafety/communityguidelines.html and YouTube's policy center https://support.google.com/youtube/topic/2676378?hl=en&ref_topic=6151248. We also reserve the right to remove comments with vulgar language. We have YouTube's community contributed subtitles feature on to allow translations for different languages. YouTube automatically credits the different language contributors below (unless the contributor had opted out of being credited). We are thankful for those that contribute different languages. If you have a concern about community contributed contributions, please contact us.
Views: 775294 Amoeba Sisters
The Cell Cycle (and cancer) [Updated]
 
09:19
Explore the cell cycle with the Amoeba Sisters and an important example of when it is not controlled: cancer. Expand video details for table of contents. 👇 Video also mentions cell cycle checkpoints and cell cycle control. Table of Contents: 1:00 Cell Growth and Cell Reproduction 1:42 Cancer (explaining uncontrolled cell growth) 3:27 Cell Cycle 5:26 Cell Cycle Checkpoints 6:48 Cell Cycle Regulation 8:16 G0 Phase of Cell Cycle Vocabulary in this video includes the words apoptosis, G1, S, G2, mitosis, and cytokinesis. Positive regulator proteins such as cyclins and cyclin dependent kinases are briefly mentioned as well as a negative regulator protein p53. Positive and negative regulation reference regarding cyclin types and cyclin rise/fall areas [in humans]: OpenStax, Biology. OpenStax CNX. http://cnx.org/contents/[email protected] Are you interested in how blood supply to cancer cells may differ from blood supply to healthy cells? Learn more in this Further Reading: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2661770/ Support us on Patreon! http://www.patreon.com/amoebasisters Our FREE resources: GIFs: http://www.amoebasisters.com/gifs.html Handouts: http://www.amoebasisters.com/handouts.html Comics: http://www.amoebasisters.com/parameciumparlorcomics Connect with us! Website: http://www.AmoebaSisters.com Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/AmoebaSisters Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/AmoebaSisters Tumblr: http://www.amoebasisters.tumblr.com Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/AmoebaSister­s Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/amoebasistersofficial/ Visit our Redbubble store at http://www.amoebasisters.com/store.html The Amoeba Sisters videos demystify science with humor and relevance. The videos center on Pinky's certification and experience in teaching science at the high school level. Pinky's teacher certification is in grades 4-8 science and 8-12 composite science (encompassing biology, chemistry, and physics). Amoeba Sisters videos only cover concepts that Pinky is certified to teach, and they focus on her specialty: secondary life science. For more information about The Amoeba Sisters, visit: http://www.amoebasisters.com/about-us.html We cover the basics in biology concepts at the secondary level. If you are looking to discover more about biology and go into depth beyond these basics, our recommended reference is the FREE, peer reviewed, open source OpenStax biology textbook: https://openstax.org/details/books/biology We take pride in our AWESOME community, and we welcome feedback and discussion. However, please remember that this is an education channel. See YouTube's community guidelines https://www.youtube.com/yt/policyandsafety/communityguidelines.html and YouTube's policy center https://support.google.com/youtube/topic/2676378?hl=en&ref_topic=6151248. We also reserve the right to remove comments with vulgar language. Music is this video is listed free to use/no attribution required from the YouTube audio library https://www.youtube.com/audiolibrary/music?feature=blog We have YouTube's community contributed subtitles feature on to allow translations for different languages, and we are thankful for those that contribute different languages! YouTube automatically credits the different language contributors below (unless the contributor had opted out of being credited). We are not affiliated with any of the translated subtitle credits that YouTube may place below. If you have a concern about community contributed contributions, please contact us.
Views: 73064 Amoeba Sisters
Cyclins and CDKs Cell Cycle Regulation
 
06:16
A cell can switch from G0, or cell cycle arrest, to G1 once cells have attained a critical size. For multicellular organisms, growth factors and mitogens, which are substances encouraging cell division, need to be present. For unicellular organisms, nutrients must be adequate in surroundings. Once G1 is initiated, Cyclin D is synthesized and drives the G1/S phase transition. In eukaryotes, Cyclin D binds with CDK 4 and CDK 6. These two complexes can partially phosphorylate retinoblastoma tumour suppressor protein, or Rb for short. Rb is bound to E2F, a transcription factor. When the CD-CDK4 and CD-CDK6 complexes partially phosphorylate Rb, it loosens its grip on E2F. E2F can then activate transcription of the cyclin E gene. Cyclin E binds CDK2, and this complex fully phosphorylates Rb, completing its inactivation. Cyclin E also phosphorylates p27Kip1, an inhibitor of Cyclin D. Phosphorylation of p27Kip1 tags it for degradation. Degradation of this protein promotes expression of cyclin A. E2F also promotes transcription of cyclin A by removing the repressor molecule cell-cycle-responsive element (or CCRE) from the promotor, allowing the cell to enter S phase. The action of E2F on Cyclin A expression is part of a negative feedback loop, since the Cyclin A-CDK2 complex phosphorylates E2F, preventing it from removing the repressor molecule. Cyclin A is the ONLY cyclin that plays a role in regulation of two cell cycle stages. It can activate two CDKs – CDK2 and CDK1. When Cyclin A forms a complex with CDK2, it allows the cell to progress to S phase. Meanwhile, binding of Cyclin A to CDK1 allows entry into M phase. During S phase, Cyclin A resides in the nucleus. It directs the initiation and completion of DNA replication. Critically, Cyclin A ensures that DNA replication only occurs ONCE per cell cycle by preventing assembly of excessive replication complexes. How does it accomplish this? Well, remember how Cyclin E is around at the end of G1? One way in which it helps the cell move into S phase is by initiating assembly of the pre-replication complex. This complex is needed for DNA replication to occur, and forms at the origin of replication. However, Cyclin A also associates with CDK2, and replaces Cyclin E. Once the Cyclin A-CDK2 complex concentration reaches a critical threshold, assembly of the pre-replication complex is terminated. The Cyclin A-CDK2 complex also regulates DNA replication by phosphorylating certain DNA replication machinery components. Later in the S phase, Cyclin A also forms a complex with CDK1, remaining bound until late in the G2 phase, when it is replaced by cyclin B. The Cyclin A-CDK1 complex is believed to aid in activation and stabilization of the Cyclin B-CDK1 complex before being ubiquitinated. This degradation of the Cyclin A-CDK1 complex induces mitotic exit – in other words, the end of mitosis. Cyclin B is a mitotic cyclin which binds to CDK1 to form the maturation promoting factor, or mitosis promoting factor – abbreviated MPF. The concentration of MPF rises until mitosis, until its concentration falls abruptly due to degradation of Cyclin B. High concentrations of Cyclin B are necessary for cells to enter M phase, and low concentrations are needed to exit M phase.
Views: 370 Neural Academy
Regulating the Cell Cycle
 
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The video discusses the ways that the cell cycle is controlled, and what happens when it is not controlled. Regulatory proteins, both internal and external, are explained. Also, apoptosis is explained; and what happens when we have too little or too much cell death. Finally, cancer, the forms, general causes, and general treatments are discussed.
Views: 2405 Jaime Jackson
Regulation of Cell Cycle
 
05:05
Cyclin dependent kinases and the checkpoints
Views: 18261 John Chapman
Cell cycle control
 
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This lecture explains about the cell cycle control and role of cell cycle checkpoints in cell cycle regulation. http://shomusbiology.com/ Download the study materials here- http://shomusbiology.weebly.com/bio-materials.html In this video tutorial the pathways of cell cycle regulation from G1 to S phase is demonstrated in detail. The cell cycle, or cell-division cycle, is the series of events that take place in a cell leading to its division and duplication (replication). In cells without a nucleus (prokaryotic), the cell cycle occurs via a process termed binary fission. In cells with a nucleus (eukaryotes), the cell cycle can be divided in two periods: interphase—during which the cell grows, accumulating nutrients needed for mitosis and duplicating its DNA—and the mitosis (M) phase, during which the cell splits itself into two distinct cells, often called "daughter cells" and the final phase, cytokinesis, where the new cell is completely divided. The cell-division cycle is a vital process by which a single-celled fertilized egg develops into a mature organism, as well as the process by which hair, skin, blood cells, and some internal organs are renewed. Source of the article published in description is Wikipedia. I am sharing their material. © by original content developers of Wikipedia. Link- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page
Views: 17382 Shomu's Biology
Cell Cycle, Mitosis and Meiosis
 
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028 - Cell Cycle, Mitosis and Meiosis Paul Andersen explains how the cell cycle is used to create new cells. The creation of identical diploid daughter cells, through mitosis, is described. The creation of unique haploid daughter cells, through meiosis is also described. The importance of cyclin and cyclin dependent kinases to regulate the cell cycle is included. Do you speak another language? Help me translate my videos: http://www.bozemanscience.com/translations/ All of the images are licensed under creative commons and public domain licensing: "File:Cell Cycle 2-2.svg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed November 29, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Cell_Cycle_2-2.svg. "File:Cyclin Expression.svg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed November 29, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Cyclin_Expression.svg. "File:Major Events in Mitosis.svg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed November 29, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Major_events_in_mitosis.svg. "File:Meiosis Overview.svg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed November 29, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Meiosis_Overview.svg. File:Schmetaphase.png, n.d. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Schmetaphase.png. "File:Tinción Hematoxilina-Eosina.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed November 29, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Tinci%C3%B3n_hematoxilina-eosina.jpg. goat, Electric. English: Simplified Illustration Created by Electric Goat. Homologous Chromosomes in Mitosis (upper) and Meiosis (bottom)., March 24, 2005. Own work. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Chromosomes_in_mitosis_and_meiosis.png. User:Davepape. Desert Grassland Whiptail Lizard (w:Cnemidophorus Uniparens), at the w:Buffalo Zoo, June 16, 2006. Own work. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Cnemidophorus_uniparens_(Buffalo_Zoo).jpg. Xander89. An Hourglass, May 9, 2008. Own work. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Hourglass_modern.svg. Intro Music Atribution Title: I4dsong_loop_main.wav Artist: CosmicD Link to sound: http://www.freesound.org/people/CosmicD/sounds/72556/ Creative Commons Atribution License
Views: 865904 Bozeman Science
Cell Cycle.mp4
 
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PCB2131, University of West Florida, Cell Cycle, Cyclins, and Cyclin dependent kinases
Views: 32688 Peter Cavnar
Cell cycle regulation as perJNU, CSIR-NET, GATE, DBT, GRE and ICMR syllabus
 
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Cell cycle is the event of division of cell in two daughter cells. In this process DNA is equally distributed to the daughter cell. It take place in two different types of cells: somatic and gametic cells. In case of somatic cell daughter cell has diploid number of DNA while it is haploid in case of germ cells. Cell cycle is highly regulated process. Any defect in the cell cycle leads to cancer of some sever problem. There are certain checkpoints in each stages (G1, S, G2, M) of cell cycle. In case of embryonic cells there are only two stages of cell cycle: S-phase and M-phase. Maturation promoting factor (MPF) regulate at each stages of cell cycle. MPF is the combination of Cdk and cyclin. In case of humans there are various group of cyclin and Cdk. There association and dissociation is regulated by phosphorylation. In spite of these it is also checked that DNA should not exceed its replication. This is controlled by MCM protein. All these things are clearly explained in this video with nice animation.
Cell Cycle Checkpoints
 
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A description of cell cycle control and checkpoints to ensure genome stability in replicating cells.
Views: 257274 Johnny Clore
David O. Morgan (UCSF) Part 1: Controlling the Cell Cycle: Introduction
 
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https://www.ibiology.org/cell-biology/controlling-cell-cycle/ Cells reproduce by duplicating their chromosomes and other components and then distributing them into a pair of genetically identical daughter cells. This series of events is called the cell cycle. In the first part of this lecture, I provide a general overview of the cell-cycle control system, a complex regulatory network that guides the cell through the steps of cell division. I briefly describe the major components of this regulatory system and how they fit together to form a series of biochemical switches that trigger cell-cycle events at the correct time and in the correct order.
Views: 24068 iBiology
Cell cycle regulation : biology concepts and connections | mind map 9
 
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Cell cycle regulation - This mind map concepts and connection series tutorial will explain using mind map to illustrate the different checkpoints of cell cycle regulation. For more information, log on to- http://shomusbiology.weebly.com/ Download the study materials here- http://shomusbiology.weebly.com/bio-materials.html
Views: 1610 Shomu's Biology
cell cycle control
 
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cell cycle control
Views: 83664 sybilsun
Role of pRB in cell cycle control
 
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This video describes the role of pRB in cell cycle regulation and cancer
Views: 8422 Arpan Parichha
Regulation of cell cycle progress: The role of CDK/ Cyclin complexes
 
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Visual animation with a 'sweet twist' of the key CDK/Cyclin complexes and their regulators in the cell cycle progression timeline We do not own rights to this song. All rights go to their respective owners. Group Name: GI-Joe...more like G1 - Go
p53 and Cell cycle arrest
 
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How p53 induces cell cycle arrest in DNA damaged cells? Pathway Explained http://www.biologyexams4u.com/2013/08/how-p53-induces-cell-cycle-arrest-in.html p53 'Guardian of the genome' and 'Policeman of the Oncogenes' http://www.biologyexams4u.com/2013/08/p53-guardian-of-genome-and-policeman-of.html How p53 induces apoptosis in DNA damaged cells? http://www.biologyexams4u.com/2013/08/how-p53-induces-apoptosis-in-dna.html
Views: 39484 biologyexams4u
Cell Cycle Regulation
 
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This Introduction to Biology video teaches the different steps for cell cycle regulation.
Cell Cycle Regulation
 
05:02
The cell cycle is regulated by both external and internal factors. A combination of different factors influences cells to grow, divide, and eventually die.
Views: 3360 Brian Bennett
Cell Cycle Regulation
 
09:45
The cell cycle is highly regulated, much like molecular genetic regulation. Each section of interphase has specific checkpoints in place to prevent damaged cells from replicating. This video covers basic cell cycle regulation mechanisms in eukaryotes.
Views: 219 Brian Bennett
Helen Piwnica-Worms (U. Texas) 1: A Historical Perspective on Cell Cycle Regulation
 
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Helen Piwnica-Worms provides a historical perspective on cell cycle regulation and outlines important experiments that revealed crucial mediators of the cell cycle. Part 1: Frogs, Clams, Yeast & Human Cancer: Historical Perspective on Cell Cycle Regulation: Helen Piwnica-Worms provides a historical perspective on cell cycle regulation and outlines important experiments that revealed crucial mediators of the cell cycle. Part 2: Translating Fundamental Cell Cycle Principles to Targeted Cancer Therapies: Helen Piwnica-Worms explains how scientists have used their understanding of the cell cycle regulation to generate targeted cancer therapies. https://www.ibiology.org/ibioseminars/frogs-clams-yeast-human-cancer-historical-perspective-cell-cycle-regulation.html Talk Overview: In her first talk, Dr. Helen Piwnica-Worms provides a historical perspective on cell cycle regulation and outlines important experiments in frogs, clams, and yeast that revealed crucial mediators of the cell cycle. Scientists observed that there were factors that allowed cell cycle progression, while there were other factors that prevented the cell from going backward. Using these model organisms, scientists were able to characterize the activation of the inducer of mitosis, the M-Phase promoting factor, which is a heterodimer between cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdc2/Cdk1) and cyclin B.    In her second talk, Piwnica-Worms explains how scientists have used their understanding of the cell cycle regulation to generate targeted cancer therapies. The cell has proteins that serve as cell cycle checkpoints, which allows the cell to respond appropriately to DNA damage. Although not all of the checkpoints are functional in a cancer cell, these cells still need the checkpoint proteins to respond to DNA damage. Piwnica-Worms’ laboratory studies the use of combining DNA damage agents with checkpoint inhibitors to selectively kill cancer cells. Her laboratory developed a patient-derived xenograft mouse model to study Triple Negative Breast Cancer (TNBC), and predict how the genotype of the tumor affects treatment. Speaker Biography: Dr. Helen Piwnica-Worms is professor of experimental radiation oncology at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. She completed her bachelor’s degree in Biology at St. Olaf College in 1979, a doctoral degree in microbiology and immunology at Duke University Medical School in 1984, and a postdoctoral fellowship in pathology at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in 1988. In 1989, Piwnica-Worms joined the faculty of Tufts University Medical School, and in 1992 she moved to the Microbiology and Molecular Genetics department at Harvard Medical School. In 1994, she joined the faculty at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, where she was the chair of Cell Biology and Physiology. Since 2013, Piwnica-Worms assumed the role of Vice Provost of Science and Professor of Experimental Radiation Oncology at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. As a basic research scientist, she was interested in understanding how the cell cycle was regulated. She showed how basic research discoveries allow for a better understanding of molecular underpinnings that opens new strategies to treat diseases, like cancer. Using immunocompromised mice, her laboratory developed a mouse model to perform preclinical studies using breast cancer cells from patients. For her scientific contributions, she was an Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute from 1994 to 2011 and was elected as a member of the National Academy of Medicine in 2013. Learn more about Piwnica-Worms’ research at her lab website: https://www.mdanderson.org/research/departments-labs-institutes/labs/helen-piwnica-worms-laboratory.html
Views: 2926 iBiology