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Cost of Capital and Cost of Equity | Business Finance
 
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http://goo.gl/qQjWG8 for more free video tutorials covering Business Finance. This video explains two important concepts of business finance- cost of capital & cost of equity. First part of the video discusses on cost of capital drawing an example of a firm in terms of debt and equity. The cost of capital primarily depends upon the use of funds not the source. Next, the video briefly discusses on cost of equity referring the returns that investors holding shares in a firm require subsequent to an explanation on SML approach and dividend growth model. Moving on the video also asks to calculate the cost of equity for an example of extremely prices shares. Step by step calculation has shown and ways to find out some important parameters are demonstrated visibly. Good understanding on cost of capital; cost of equity & there in between relationship as well as having knowledge on different methods of calculation is imperative to become an expert on today’s business finance and accountancy.
Views: 91929 Spoon Feed Me
Cost of Equity (dividend model) (Talking Head)
 
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FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT – A COMPLETE STUDY If you enjoyed this content make sure to check the full course. Click on the following link to avail discount (only for Rs 640 ). https://bit.ly/2MJkU3W Indepth Analysis through 300+ lectures and case studies for CA / CFA / CPA / CMA / MBA Finance Exams and Professionals ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Welcome to one of the comprehensive ever course on Financial Management – relevant for any one aspiring to understand Financial Management and useful for students pursing courses like CA / CMA / CS / CFA / CPA, etc. A Course with close to 300 lectures explaining each and every concept in Financial Management followed by Solved Case Studies (Video), Conversational Style Articles explaining the concepts, Hand outs for download, Quizzes and what not?? ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ This course is about Financial Management. By taking up this course, you will have opportunity to learn the all facets of Financial Management. Knowledge on Financial Management is important for every Entrepreneur and Finance Managers. Ignorance in Financial Management can be disastrous because it would invite serious trouble for the very functioning of the organisation. This is a comprehensive course, covering each and every topic in detail. In this course,you will learn the Financial Management basic concepts, theories, and techniques which deals with conceptual frame work. Following topics will be covered in this course a) Introduction to Financial Management (covering role of CFO, difference between Financial Management, Accounting and other disciplines) b) Time Value of Money c) Financial Analysis through Ratios (covering ratios for performance evaluation and financial health, application of ratio analysis in decision making). d) Financial Analysis through Cash Flow Statement e) Financial Analysis through Fund Flow Statement f) Cost of Capital of Business (Weighted Average Cost of Capital and Marginal Cost of Capital) g) Capital Structuring Decisions (Capital Structuring Patterns, Designing optimum capital structure, Capital Structure Theories). h) Leverage Analysis (Operating Leverage, Financial Leverage and Combined Leverage) I) Various Sources of Finance j) Capital Budgeting Decisions (Payback, ARR, MPV, IRR, MIRR) k) Working Capital Management (Working Capital Cycle, Cash Cost, Budgetary Control, Inventory Management, Receivables Management, Payables Management, Treasury Management) This course is structured in self learning style. It will have good number of video lectures covering all the above topics discussed. Simple English used for presentation. Take this course to understand Financial Management comprehensively. Mandatory Disclosure regarding course contents: This course is basically a bundle of following courses: a) Time Value of Money b) Cash Flow Statement Analysis c) Fund Flow Statement Analysis d) Finance Management Ratio Analysis e) Learn how to find cost of funds f) Learn Capital Structuring g) Learn NPV and IRR Techniques h) Working Capital Management. If you are purchasing this course, make sure you don't purchase the above courses. Also note, this course is also bundled in comprehensive course named Accounting, Finance and Banking - A Comprehensive Study. So if you are purchasing above course, make sure you don't purchase this course. • Category: Business What's in the Course? 1. Over 346 lectures and 48 hours of content! 2. Understand Basics of Financial Management 3. Understand Importance of Time Value of Money 4. Understand Financial Ratio Analysis 5. Understand Cash Flow Analysis 6. Understand Fund Flow Analysis 7. Understand Cost of Capital 8. Understand Capital Structuring 9. Understand Capital Budgeting Process 10. Understand Working Capital Management 11. Understand Various sources of Finance Course Requirements: 1. Students can approach with fresh mind Who Should Attend? 1. Any one who wants to learn Financial Management comprehensively 2. MBA (Finance) students 3. CA / CMA / CS / CFA / CPA / CIMA
Views: 17314 CARAJACLASSES
Cost of Capital [Cost of Debt, Preference Shares, Equity and Retained Earnings] ~ FM
 
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Described the procedure and concept to calculate cost of Debt, Cost of Preference Shares, Cost of Equity and Cost of Retained Earnings. Student can also watch the following lectures related with the Financial Management : 1. Capital Budgeting (Introduction) - Financial Management : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZOaGNDmKpzo 2. Present Value of Perpetuity : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gVxvJ_JTiug 3. Time Value of Money (Introduction) - Financial Management : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oeox8DLagHU 4. Leverage Analysis (Introduction) Financial Management : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3l1iB_-xZBw 5. Cash Budget (Introduction) : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s1Yx5bFOZfo 🔴 Connect on Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/ca.naresh.aggarwal 🔴 Download Assignments: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0BzfDYffb228JNW9WdVJyQlQ2eHc?usp=sharing 🔴 Connect with Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/+CANareshAggarwal
Views: 69143 CA. Naresh Aggarwal
FIN 401 - WACC (Cost of Equity) - Ryerson University
 
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LIST OF FIN401 VIDEOS ORGANIZED BY CHAPTER http://www.fin401.ca FIN300 FIN 300 CFIN300 CFIN 300 - Ryerson University FIN401 FIN 401 CFIN401 CFIN 401 - Ryerson University Key Words: MHF4U, Nelson, Advanced Functions, Mcgraw Hill, Grade 12, Toronto, Mississauga, Tutor, Math, Polynomial Functions, Division, Ontario, University, rick hansen secondary school, john fraser secondary school, applewood heights secondary school, greater toronto area, lorne park secondary school, clarkson secondary school, mpm1d, mpm2d, mcr3u, mcv4u, tutoring, university of waterloo, queens university, university of western, york university, university of toronto, finance, uoft, reciprocals, reciprocal of a function, library, bonds, stocks, npv, equity, balance sheet, income statement, liabilities, CCA, cca tax shield, capital cost allowance, finance, managerial finance, fin 300, fin300, fin 401, fin401, irr, profitability index,
Views: 11891 AllThingsMathematics
Weighted Average Cost of Capital (WACC)
 
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This video explains the concept of WACC (the Weighted Average Cost of Capital). An example is provided to demonstrate how to calculate WACC. Edspira is your source for business and financial education. To view the entire video library for free, visit http://www.Edspira.com To like us on Facebook, visit https://www.facebook.com/Edspira Edspira is the creation of Michael McLaughlin, who went from teenage homelessness to a PhD. The goal of Michael's life is to increase access to education so all people can achieve their dreams. To learn more about Michael's story, visit http://www.MichaelMcLaughlin.com To follow Michael on Facebook, visit https://facebook.com/Prof.Michael.McLaughlin To follow Michael on Twitter, visit https://twitter.com/Prof_McLaughlin
Views: 288303 Edspira
WACC, Cost of Equity, and Cost of Debt in a DCF
 
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In this WACC and Cost of Equity tutorial, you'll learn how changes to assumptions in a DCF impact variables like the Cost of Equity, Cost of Debt. By http://breakingintowallstreet.com/ "Financial Modeling Training And Career Resources For Aspiring Investment Bankers" You'll also learn about WACC (Weighted Average Cost of Capital) - and why it is not always so straightforward to answer these questions in interviews. Table of Contents: 2:22 Why Everything is Interrelated 4:22 Summary of Factors That Impact a DCF 6:37 Changes to Debt Percentages in the Capital Structure 11:38 The Risk-Free Rate, Equity Risk Premium, and Beta 12:49 The Tax Rate 14:55 Recap and Summary Why Do WACC, the Cost of Equity, and the Cost of Debt Matter? This is a VERY common interview question: "If a company goes from 10% debt to 30% debt, does its WACC increase or decrease?" "What if the Risk-Free Rate changes? How is everything else impacted?" "What if the company is bigger / smaller?" Plus, you need to use these concepts on the job all the time when valuing companies… these "costs" represent your opportunity cost from investing in a specific company, and you use them to evaluate that company's cash flows and determine how much the company is worth to you. EX: If you can get a 10% yield by investing in other, similar companies in this market, you'd evaluate this company's cash flows against that 10% "discount rate"… …and if this company's debt, tax rate, or overall size changes, you better know how the discount rate also changes! It could easily change the company's value to you, the investor. The Most Important Concept… Everything is interrelated - in other words, more debt will impact BOTH the equity AND the debt investors! Why? Because additional leverage makes the company riskier for everyone involved. The chance of bankruptcy is higher, so the "cost" even to the equity investors increases. AND: Other variables like the Risk-Free Rate will end up impacting everything, including Cost of Equity and Cost of Debt, because both of them are tied to overall interest rates on "safe" government bonds. Tricky: Some changes only make an impact when a company actually has debt (changes to the tax rate), and you can't always predict how the value derived from a DCF will change in response to this. Changes to the DCF Analysis and the Impact on Cost of Equity, Cost of Debt, WACC, and Implied Value: Smaller Company: Cost of Debt, Equity, and WACC are all higher. Bigger Company: Cost of Debt, Equity, and WACC are all lower. * Assuming the same capital structure percentages - if the capital structure is NOT the same, this could go either way. Emerging Market: Cost of Debt, Equity, and WACC are all higher. No Debt to Some Debt: Cost of Equity and Cost of Debt are higher. WACC is lower at first, but eventually higher. Some Debt to No Debt: Cost of Equity and Cost of Debt are lower. It's impossible to say how WACC changes because it depends on where you are in the "U-shaped curve" - if you're above the debt % that minimizes WACC, WACC will decrease. Otherwise, if you're at that minimum or below it, WACC will increase. Higher Risk-Free Rate: Cost of Equity, Debt, and WACC are all higher; they're all lower with a lower Risk-Free Rate. Higher Equity Risk Premium and Higher Beta: Cost of Equity is higher, and so is WACC; Cost of Debt doesn't change in a predictable way in response to these. When these are lower, Cost of Equity and WACC are both lower. Higher Tax Rate: Cost of Equity, Debt, and WACC are all lower; they're higher when the tax rate is lower. ** Assumes the company has debt - if it does not, taxes don't make an impact because there is no tax benefit to interest paid on debt.
ACCA F9 The cost of capital -  The cost of equity
 
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ACCA F9 The cost of capital - The cost of equity Estimating the rate of growth in dividends Free lectures for the ACCA F9 Financial Management To benefit from this lecture, visit opentuition.com to download the free lectures notes used in the lecture and access all our free resources including all F9 lectures, practice tests and Ask the Tutor Forums. http://opentuition.com/acca/f9/ Please go to opentuition to post questions to ACCA F9 Tutor, we do not provide support on youtube. *** Complete list of free ACCA F9 lectures is available on http://opentuition.com/acca/f9/ ***
Views: 10382 OpenTuition
ACCA P4 The Cost of Capital (part 1 - Cost of Equity)
 
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ACCA P4 The Cost of Capital (part 1 - Cost of Equity) Free lectures for the ACCA P4 Advanced Financial Management Exams
Views: 14766 OpenTuition
Cost of equity
 
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Ke =R f + Beta*(Rm-Rf)
Views: 10534 DVRamanaXIMB
Chapter 6 - Cost of Equity using Yahoo Finance
 
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Use the Gordon Discounted Dividend Model and information available about a company on Yahoo Finance to estimate a firms cost of equity.
Views: 8973 Jaime Lancaster
What is COST OF EQUITY? What does COST OF EQUITY mean? COST OF EQUITY meaning & explanation
 
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What is COST OF EQUITY? What does COST OF EQUITY mean? COST OF EQUITY meaning - COST OF EQUITY definition - COST OF EQUITY explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. In finance, the cost of equity is the return (often expressed as a rate of return) a firm theoretically pays to its equity investors, i.e., shareholders, to compensate for the risk they undertake by investing their capital. Firms need to acquire capital from others to operate and grow. Individuals and organizations who are willing to provide their funds to others naturally desire to be rewarded. Just as landlords seek rents on their property, capital providers seek returns on their funds, which must be commensurate with the risk undertaken. Firms obtain capital from two kinds of sources: lenders and equity investors. From the perspective of capital providers, lenders seek to be rewarded with interest and equity investors seek dividends and/or appreciation in the value of their investment (capital gain). From a firm's perspective, they must pay for the capital it obtains from others, which is called its cost of capital. Such costs are separated into a firm's cost of debt and cost of equity and attributed to these two kinds of capital sources. While a firm's present cost of debt is relatively easy to determine from observation of interest rates in the capital markets, its current cost of equity is unobservable and must be estimated. Finance theory and practice offers various models for estimating a particular firm's cost of equity such as the capital asset pricing model, or CAPM. Another method is derived from the Gordon Model, which is a discounted cash flow model based on dividend returns and eventual capital return from the sale of the investment. Another simple method is the Bond Yield Plus Risk Premium (BYPRP), where a subjective risk premium is added to the firm's long-term debt interest rate. Moreover, a firm's overall cost of capital, which consists of the two types of capital costs, can be estimated using the weighted average cost of capital model. According to finance theory, as a firm's risk increases/decreases, its cost of capital increases/decreases. This theory is linked to observation of human behavior and logic: capital providers expect reward for offering their funds to others. Such providers are usually rational and prudent preferring safety over risk. They naturally require an extra reward as an incentive to place their capital in a riskier investment instead of a safer one. If an investment's risk increases, capital providers demand higher returns or they will place their capital elsewhere. Knowing a firm's cost of capital is needed in order to make better decisions. Managers make capital budgeting decisions while capital providers make decisions about lending and investment. Such decisions can be made after quantitative analysis that typically uses a firm's cost of capital as a model input.
Views: 1960 The Audiopedia
Cost of Capital - Part 1 The Cost of Equity
 
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Cost of Capital Part 2 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vdq2jsZwgoo Cost of Capital Part 3 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=da34fVjbvMo
Views: 18333 Ronald Moy
Cost of Capital - Cost of Equity (using CAPM)
 
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Cost of Capital - Cost of Equity (using CAPM)
Views: 20807 Michael Holder
Equity vs. debt | Stocks and bonds | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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Debt vs. Equity. Market Capitalization, Asset Value, and Enterprise Value. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/venture-capital-and-capital-markets/v/chapter-7-bankruptcy-liquidation?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/venture-capital-and-capital-markets/v/more-on-ipos?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: This is an old set of videos, but if you put up with Sal's messy handwriting (it has since improved) and spotty sound, there is a lot to be learned here. In particular, this tutorial walks through starting, financing and taking public a company (and even talks about what happens if it has trouble paying its debts). About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 321894 Khan Academy
WACC Problems - DCF approach to cost of equity
 
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This problem uses the discounted cash flow (DCF) approach to estimating the cost of equity capital. This key assumptions of this method are that a company pays dividends that grow at a constant, predictable rate.
Views: 219 mike barth
3 Minutes! CAPM Finance and the Capital Asset Pricing Model
 
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omg Wow! So easy clicked here http://mbabullshit.com/ for CAPM or Capital Asset Pricing Model Formula If You Like My Free Videos, Support Me at https://www.patreon.com/MBAbull Imagine you have a friend named Bob with his money safely deposited in a bank at a 5% interest rate per year and that you have a scary and risky company which also earns an average 5% profit for owners or investors per year. Can you convince Bob to withdraw his money from the bank and invest in your business? No way! If your business is riskier than the bank, then Bob would want an average return much bigger than 5%. Now what if... Bob also has some money invested in the general stock market, which is kinda risky, but not as risky as your scary company... and he earns an average profit of 8% per year. Can you offer Bob also 8% to convince him to sell his stock market portfolio and invest in your company instead? Again, no way! If your company is riskier and scarier than the general stock market, then you would have to offer Bob an average return higher than 8%, to reward Bob for his higher risk. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gzxKd2S2MdU So the question now is... exactly how much average % return should you offer Bob, to make his investment worth his risk in your scary company? This % is called your "cost of equity"... and we calculate it using the CAPM or Capital Asset Pricing Model Formula. The Capital Asset Pricing Model or CAPM formula factors in Bob's risk and return from his other investments, and then tells us how much Bob should reasonably expect from your riskier company. That's why your "cost of equity" is also called your investor's "expected return." Would you like learn the CAPM with more analysis and detail as well as how to calculate it the EASY way? Check out my free step-by-step tutorial video and download my free cheat-sheet on CAPM at MBAbullshit.com. See ya there!
Views: 347142 MBAbullshitDotCom
3 Minutes! Weighted Average Cost of Capital (wacc)
 
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omg I'm SHOCKED so easy clicked here http://mbabullshit.com/ for Weighted Average Cost of Capital or WACC... If You Like My Free Videos, Support Me at https://www.patreon.com/MBAbull Let's say you need money to do business... this is called capital. However, where do you get this capital? You get it from either the owners' money (equity) or you get it from borrowing from the bank or other sources (debt). http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wz6Dwbp2XiI If your capital is borrowed from the bank, does this have a cost? Yes! It's the interest on your loan. So if the interest rate is 5%, then your cost of capital is also 5%. But if your capital comes from investors instead of a bank loan, does this have a cost? Yes! It's the expected return of your investors. If investors are expecting a 10% average return by investing with you, then your cost of capital is 10%. It's called a "weighted" average because it gives more "weight" or importance to either your borrowed capital or your investors' money, whichever is greater. Now here comes our problem... What if part of your capital comes from bank borrowing at 5%, and another part of your capital comes from investors expecting 10%? Is your cost of capital 5% like the bank loan or 10% like the investors' expected return? Of course, it's something in between... but not exactly in between because you might have more of one than the other. Check out my free video and also download my free WACC cheat-sheet at MBAbullshit.com . See ya there! (Note, we are different from Investopedia)
Views: 364374 MBAbullshitDotCom
WACC, cost of equity and cost of debt
 
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How to calculate WACC when given only data about dividends, share price, bonds and book values. Uses dividend valuation model, interpolation and weighted average cost of capital. Investment appraisal. Financial management. Buy the book here: http://www.lulu.com/shop/bryan-mills/financial-management-made-manageable/paperback/product-23253099.html
Views: 1583 Bryan Mills
Cost of Equity
 
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Did you liked this video lecture? Then please check out the complete course related to this lecture, FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT – A COMPLETE STUDYwith 500+ Lectures, 71+ hours content available at discounted price(only Rs.640) with life time validity and certificate of completion. https://bit.ly/2MJkU3W Indepth Analysis through 300+ lectures and case studies for CA / CFA / CPA / CMA / MBA Finance Exams and Professionals ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Welcome to one of the comprehensive ever course on Financial Management – relevant for any one aspiring to understand Financial Management and useful for students pursing courses like CA / CMA / CS / CFA / CPA, etc. A Course with close to 300 lectures explaining each and every concept in Financial Management followed by Solved Case Studies (Video), Conversational Style Articles explaining the concepts, Hand outs for download, Quizzes and what not?? ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ This course is about Financial Management. By taking up this course, you will have opportunity to learn the all facets of Financial Management. Knowledge on Financial Management is important for every Entrepreneur and Finance Managers. Ignorance in Financial Management can be disastrous because it would invite serious trouble for the very functioning of the organisation. This is a comprehensive course, covering each and every topic in detail. In this course,you will learn the Financial Management basic concepts, theories, and techniques which deals with conceptual frame work. Following topics will be covered in this course a) Introduction to Financial Management (covering role of CFO, difference between Financial Management, Accounting and other disciplines) b) Time Value of Money c) Financial Analysis through Ratios (covering ratios for performance evaluation and financial health, application of ratio analysis in decision making). d) Financial Analysis through Cash Flow Statement e) Financial Analysis through Fund Flow Statement f) Cost of Capital of Business (Weighted Average Cost of Capital and Marginal Cost of Capital) g) Capital Structuring Decisions (Capital Structuring Patterns, Designing optimum capital structure, Capital Structure Theories). h) Leverage Analysis (Operating Leverage, Financial Leverage and Combined Leverage) I) Various Sources of Finance j) Capital Budgeting Decisions (Payback, ARR, MPV, IRR, MIRR) k) Working Capital Management (Working Capital Cycle, Cash Cost, Budgetary Control, Inventory Management, Receivables Management, Payables Management, Treasury Management) This course is structured in self learning style. It will have good number of video lectures covering all the above topics discussed. Simple English used for presentation. Take this course to understand Financial Management comprehensively. Mandatory Disclosure regarding course contents: This course is basically a bundle of following courses: a) Time Value of Money b) Cash Flow Statement Analysis c) Fund Flow Statement Analysis d) Finance Management Ratio Analysis e) Learn how to find cost of funds f) Learn Capital Structuring g) Learn NPV and IRR Techniques h) Working Capital Management. If you are purchasing this course, make sure you don't purchase the above courses. Also note, this course is also bundled in comprehensive course named Accounting, Finance and Banking - A Comprehensive Study. So if you are purchasing above course, make sure you don't purchase this course. • Category: Business What's in the Course? 1. Over 346 lectures and 48 hours of content! 2. Understand Basics of Financial Management 3. Understand Importance of Time Value of Money 4. Understand Financial Ratio Analysis 5. Understand Cash Flow Analysis 6. Understand Fund Flow Analysis 7. Understand Cost of Capital 8. Understand Capital Structuring 9. Understand Capital Budgeting Process 10. Understand Working Capital Management 11. Understand Various sources of Finance Course Requirements: 1. Students can approach with fresh mind Who Should Attend? 1. Any one who wants to learn Financial Management comprehensively 2. MBA (Finance) students 3. CA / CMA / CS / CFA / CPA / CIMA
Views: 2297 CARAJACLASSES
Cost of equity (Part 2- CAPM)
 
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Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM) is most commonly used model for calculating cost of equity. Watch the video to get more insights on how to calculate Ke using CAPM and use of the model. Fb page: The Logical Finance email: [email protected]
Views: 626 Shubhangi Jain
Equity Financing (Lesson 1 of 2)
 
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A short video that explains the advantages and dis-advantages of financing a business with equity. Lesson 2 explains how to calculate the cost of equity. Presented by Matt H. Evans, CPA, CMA, CFM
Views: 3759 Matt Evans
CAPM Capital Asset Pricing Model in 4 Easy Steps - What is Capital Asset Pricing Model Explained
 
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OMG wow! I'm SHOCKED how easy clicked here http://www.MBAbullshit.com for CAPM or Capital Asset Pricing Model. This is a model applied to indicate an investor's "expected return", or how much percentage profit a company investor ought to logically demand to be a "fair" return for making investments into a company. http://mbabullshit.com/blog/2011/08/06/capm-capital-asset-pricing-model/ To find this, yet another question can be queried: Just how much is the sound "decent" percentage % profit that a financier should probably receive if he invests in a business (having comparatively high risk) in contrast to putting his money in government bonds which might be regarded to be "risk free" and instead of putting his hard earned cash in the general share market presumed to offer "medium" risk? Visibly, it is almost only "fair" that in fact the investor receives a gain higher compared to the government bond percentage (due to the reason that the solitary enterprise possesses higher risk). It's moreover only just that he should expect a return larger than the broad stock exchange yield, because the specific business enterprise has higher risk compared to the "medium risk" general stock market. So just as before,how much exactly should this investor fairly receive as a smallest expected return? This is where the CAPM Model or Capital Asset Pricing Model comes in. The CAPM Formula includes all these variables simultaneously: riskiness of the individual firm depicted by its "beta", riskiness of the universal stock market, rate of interest a "risk free" government bond would give, as well as others... and then spits out an actual percent which your investor "should be allowed" to take for investing his or her hard earned money into this "riskier" single firm. This particularly exact percent is known as the "expected return", given that it can be the yield that he should "expect" or require to obtain if he invests his hard earned cash into a specific firm. This precise percentage is known as the "cost of equity". The CAPM Model or CAPM Formula looks something like this: Expected Return = Govt. Bond Rate + (Risk represented by "Beta")(General Stock Market Return --Govt. Bond Rate) Utilizing this formula, you are able to see the theoretically exact rate of return theindividual business enterprise investor ought to reasonably expect for his or her investment, if the CAPM Model or Capital Asset Pricing Model is to be held. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LWsEJYPSw0k What is CAPM? What is the Capital Asset Pricing Model?
Views: 458823 MBAbullshitDotCom
Debt vs. Equity Analysis: How to Advise Companies on Financing
 
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In this tutorial, you’ll learn how to analyze Debt vs. Equity financing options for a company, evaluate the credit stats and ratios in different operational cases, and make a recommendation based on both qualitative and quantitative factors. http://breakingintowallstreet.com/ "Financial Modeling Training And Career Resources For Aspiring Investment Bankers" Table of Contents: 0:50 The Short, Simple Answer 3:54 The Longer Answer – Central Japan Railway Example 12:31 Recap and Summary If you have an upcoming case study where you have to analyze a company’s financial statements and recommend Debt or Equity, how should you do it? SHORT ANSWER: All else being equal, companies want the cheapest possible financing. Since Debt is almost always cheaper than Equity, Debt is almost always the answer. Debt is cheaper than Equity because interest paid on Debt is tax-deductible, and lenders’ expected returns are lower than those of equity investors (shareholders). The risk and potential returns of Debt are both lower. But there are also constraints and limitations on Debt – the company might not be able to exceed a certain Debt / EBITDA, or it might have to keep its EBITDA / Interest above a certain level. So, you have to test these constraints first and see how much Debt a company can raise, or if it has to use Equity or a mix of Debt and Equity. The Step-by-Step Process Step 1: Create different operational scenarios for the company – these can be simple, such as lower revenue growth and margins in the Downside case. Step 2: “Stress test” the company and see if it can meet the required credit stats, ratios, and other requirements in the Downside cases. Step 3: If not, try alternative Debt structures (e.g., no principal repayments but higher interest rates) and see if they work. Step 4: If not, consider using Equity for some or all of the company’s financing needs. Real-Life Example – Central Japan Railway The company needs to raise ¥1.6 trillion ($16 billion USD) of capital to finance a new railroad line. Option #1: Additional Equity funding (would represent 43% of its current Market Cap). Option #2: Term Loans with 10-year maturities, 5% amortization, ~4% interest, 50% cash flow sweep, and maintenance covenants. Option #3: Subordinated Notes with 10-year maturities, no amortization, ~8% interest rates, no early repayments, and only a Debt Service Coverage Ratio (DSCR) covenant. We start by evaluating the Term Loans since they’re the cheapest form of financing. Even in the Base Case, it would be almost impossible for the company to comply with the minimum DSCR covenant, and it looks far worse in the Downside cases Next, we try the Subordinated Notes instead – the lack of principal repayment will make it easier for the company to comply with the DSCR. The DSCR numbers are better, but there are still issues in the Downside and Extreme Downside cases. So, we decide to try some amount of Equity as well. We start with 25% or 50% Equity, which we can simulate by setting the EBITDA multiple for Debt to 1.5x or 1.0x instead. The DSCR compliance is much better in these scenarios, but we still run into problems in Year 4. Overall, though, 50% Subordinated Notes / 50% Equity is better if we strongly believe in the Extreme Downside case; 75% / 25% is better if the normal Downside case is more plausible. Qualitative factors also support our conclusions. For example, the company has extremely high EBITDA margins, low revenue growth, and stable cash flows due to its near-monopoly in the center of Japan, so it’s an ideal candidate for Debt. Also, there’s limited downside risk in the next 5-10 years; population decline in Japan is more of a concern over the next several decades. RESOURCES: https://youtube-breakingintowallstreet-com.s3.amazonaws.com/Debt-vs-Equity-Analysis-Slides.pdf
Cost of Equity | Dividend Growth Model | Corporate Finance | CPA Exam BEC | CMA Exam | Chp14 p1
 
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The cost of capital depends primarily on the use of the funds, not the source. Advantages and Disadvantages of the Approach The Securities market Line (SML) approach has two primary advantages. First, it explicitly adjusts for risk. Second, it is applicable to companies other than just those with steady dividend growth. Thus, it may be useful in a wider variety of circumstances. There are drawbacks, of course. The SML approach requires that two things be estimated: the market risk premium and the beta coefficient. To the extent that our estimates are poor, the resulting cost of equity will be inaccurate. For example, our estimate of the market risk premium, 7 percent, is based on about 100 years of returns on particular stock portfolios and markets. Using different time periods or different stocks and markets could result in very different estimates. With the dividend growth model, we essentially rely on the past to predict the future when we use the SML approach. Economic conditions can change quickly; so as always, the past may not be a good guide to the future. In the best of all worlds, both approaches (the dividend growth model and the SML) are applicable and the two result in similar answers. If this happens, we might have some confidence in our estimates. We might also wish to compare the results to those for other similar companies as a reality check.
Cost of Capital - Lecture 1
 
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www.badlanionline.com CA/CS/CMA
Views: 270646 CA dilip badlani
CFA Level I-R37- Cost of Capital- Part I
 
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The video covers first part ( out of two) of Cost of Capital, Reading 37 of CFA level I This video provides information about the following : 1. The weighted average cost of capital (WACC) . 2. Affect of taxes on cost of capital from different capital sources. 3. Alternative methods of calculating the weights used in the WACC, including the use of the company's target capital structure. 4. The marginal cost of capital and the investment opportunity schedule are used to determine the optimal capital budget. 5. The marginal cost of capital's role in determining the net present value of a project. 6. The cost of fixed rate debt capital using the yield-to-maturity approach and the debt -rating approach. 7. The cost of noncallable, nonconvertible preferred stock. 8. The cost of equity capital using the capital asset pricing model approach, the dividend discount model approach, and the bond-yield-plus risk-premium approach. 9. The beta and cost of capital for a project. 10. The country equity risk premium in the estimation of the cost of equity for a company located in a developing market. 11. The marginal cost of capital schedule. 12. The correct treatment of flotation costs.
Views: 13496 FinTree
Equity Shares. Cost of Capital. Financial Management
 
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Subject: Financial Management Topic: Cost of Capital Sub topic: Equity Shares Faculty: C.A. M.K. Jain Visit www.micecareer.com or call 09990112455 for Purchasing Video Classes of Financial management for Bcom, CA CS CMA Video Classes Satellite online Classes video lectures and online Satellite Lectures by GOLD MEDALLIST CA M K Jain Also visit www.ca-classes.in www.cs-classes.in www.cma-classes.in
Views: 5367 CA Manoj kumar Jain
Cost of  equity  and CAPM (COM)
 
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Subject : Commerce Paper : Financial Management Module : Cost of equity and CAPM Content Writer : Dr. Vanita Tripathi
Views: 853 Vidya-mitra
WACC - Cost of Equity
 
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For more questions, problem sets, and additional content please see: www.Harpett.com. Video by Chase DeHan, Assistant Professor of Finance at the University of South Carolina Upstate.
Views: 2642 Harpett
Estimating Cost Of Equity For WACC - DCF Model Insights
 
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Please like and subscribe to my channel for more content every week. If you have any questions, please comment below. In today’s video, we learn about calculating the cost of equity used in the weighted average cost of capital (WACC) calculation. This is part of the DCF insights series for more advanced students but it offers valuable insights about the assumptions used in the model. In my opinion, the cost of equity assumption is the most important consideration when calculating the WACC as it usually accounts for many of the externalities that exist. We will look at both the; - Capital asset pricing model (CAPM) - Build-up Model (BAM) While considering additional assumptions like; - Size risk premium - Country risk premium - Industry risk premium - Company specific risk premium Link to the country default spread and risk premium database; http://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/datafile/ctryprem.html Link to the Ibbotson size premium resource; http://psc.ky.gov/pscecf/2012-00221/[email protected]/10252012d/Ibbotsoin_2011_Risk_Premia_Over_Time_Report_(20110207135556).pdf Link to the Ibbotson SBBI resource; http://corporate.morningstar.com/ib/asp/detail.aspx?xmlfile=1431.xml Link to report covering build-up model (BAM); https://corporate.morningstar.com/ib/documents/MethodologyDocuments/IBBAssociates/IndustryRiskBuildup.pdf Link to the Highland Global company risk premium resource; http://csbweb01.uncw.edu/people/farinellaj/Classes/Fin430/Handouts/Company%20Risk%20Premium.pdf Link to an amazing report summarizing risk parameters by Aswath Damodaran; http://people.stern.nyu.edu/adamodar/pdfiles/papers/beta.pdf For those who may be interested in finance and investing, I suggest you check out my Seeking Alpha profile where I write about the market and different investment opportunities. I conduct a full analysis on companies and countries while also commenting on relevant news stories. http://seekingalpha.com/author/robert-bezede/articles#regular_articles
Views: 531 FinanceKid
Finance: How do you assess the cost of equity?
 
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How do you assess the cost of equity? Well, you'll need to take into account things like company valuation, cash earnings, dividends, etc.
Views: 14 Shmoop
Chapter 6 - Calculating Weighted Average Cost of Capital (WACC)
 
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Calculating Weighted Average Cost of Capital for a publicly traded firm using information found on Yahoo Finance.
Views: 19434 Jaime Lancaster
Session 13: Estimating Hurdle Rates- Financing Weights & Cost of Capital
 
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Determine the weights to use in estimating a cost of capital & how it differs from a cost of equity
Views: 13984 Aswath Damodaran
Introduction to Beta in Corporate Finance
 
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This video shows what beta is in the context of Corporate Finance. Beta is the percentage change in an asset's return, given a 1% change in the return of the market portfolio (an index such as the S&P 500 is commonly used to proxy for the market portfolio. Beta is important because it measures the amount of systematic risk an asset has. Because unsystematic risk (firm-specific risk) can be diversified away, the systematic risk of an asset is what determines the risk premium demanded by investors for holding the asset. Thus, beta can be used to calculate the cost of a firm's equity capital (for example, with the Capital Asset Pricing Model). Edspira is your source for business and financial education. To view the entire video library for free, visit http://www.Edspira.com To like us on Facebook, visit https://www.facebook.com/Edspira Edspira is the creation of Michael McLaughlin, who went from teenage homelessness to a PhD. The goal of Michael's life is to increase access to education so all people can achieve their dreams. To learn more about Michael's story, visit http://www.MichaelMcLaughlin.com To follow Michael on Facebook, visit https://facebook.com/Prof.Michael.McLaughlin To follow Michael on Twitter, visit https://twitter.com/Prof_McLaughlin
Views: 33034 Edspira
FIN 300 - Agency Costs - Ryerson University
 
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http://allthingsmathematics.teachable.com/p/ryersonfin300 FIN300 FIN 300 CFIN300 CFIN 300 - Ryerson University ADMS 3530 - York University Key Words: MHF4U, Nelson, Advanced Functions, Mcgraw Hill, Grade 12, Toronto, Mississauga, Tutor, Math, Polynomial Functions, Division, Ontario, University, rick hansen secondary school, john fraser secondary school, applewood heights secondary school, greater toronto area, lorne park secondary school, clarkson secondary school, mpm1d, mpm2d, mcr3u, mcv4u, tutoring, university of waterloo, queens university, university of western, york university, university of toronto, finance, uoft, reciprocals, reciprocal of a function, library, bonds, stocks, npv, equity, balance sheet, income statement, liabilities, CCA, cca tax shield, capital cost allowance, finance, managerial finance, fin 300, fin300, fin 401, fin401, irr, profitability index,
Views: 3931 AllThingsMathematics
Cost of Capital Hindi Lecture Full Video - Details with Examples
 
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Watch full Hindi video to know everything about Cost of Capital in this lecture by accounts guru, Vishwanath Gaur. If you have any doubt, feel free to write it in comment section. Follow us on Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/finnocode/ Our Website - http://finnocode.com/
Views: 16735 Finnocode Accounts
Difference between Debt and Equity
 
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FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT – A COMPLETE STUDY If you enjoyed this content make sure to check the full course. Click on the following link to avail discount (only for Rs 640/- ). https://bit.ly/2MJkU3W Indepth Analysis through 300+ lectures and case studies for CA / CFA / CPA / CMA / MBA Finance Exams and Professionals ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Welcome to one of the comprehensive ever course on Financial Management – relevant for any one aspiring to understand Financial Management and useful for students pursing courses like CA / CMA / CS / CFA / CPA, etc. A Course with close to 300 lectures explaining each and every concept in Financial Management followed by Solved Case Studies (Video), Conversational Style Articles explaining the concepts, Hand outs for download, Quizzes and what not?? ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ This course is about Financial Management. By taking up this course, you will have opportunity to learn the all facets of Financial Management. Knowledge on Financial Management is important for every Entrepreneur and Finance Managers. Ignorance in Financial Management can be disastrous because it would invite serious trouble for the very functioning of the organisation. This is a comprehensive course, covering each and every topic in detail. In this course,you will learn the Financial Management basic concepts, theories, and techniques which deals with conceptual frame work. Following topics will be covered in this course a) Introduction to Financial Management (covering role of CFO, difference between Financial Management, Accounting and other disciplines) b) Time Value of Money c) Financial Analysis through Ratios (covering ratios for performance evaluation and financial health, application of ratio analysis in decision making). d) Financial Analysis through Cash Flow Statement e) Financial Analysis through Fund Flow Statement f) Cost of Capital of Business (Weighted Average Cost of Capital and Marginal Cost of Capital) g) Capital Structuring Decisions (Capital Structuring Patterns, Designing optimum capital structure, Capital Structure Theories). h) Leverage Analysis (Operating Leverage, Financial Leverage and Combined Leverage) I) Various Sources of Finance j) Capital Budgeting Decisions (Payback, ARR, MPV, IRR, MIRR) k) Working Capital Management (Working Capital Cycle, Cash Cost, Budgetary Control, Inventory Management, Receivables Management, Payables Management, Treasury Management) This course is structured in self learning style. It will have good number of video lectures covering all the above topics discussed. Simple English used for presentation. Take this course to understand Financial Management comprehensively. Mandatory Disclosure regarding course contents: This course is basically a bundle of following courses: a) Time Value of Money b) Cash Flow Statement Analysis c) Fund Flow Statement Analysis d) Finance Management Ratio Analysis e) Learn how to find cost of funds f) Learn Capital Structuring g) Learn NPV and IRR Techniques h) Working Capital Management. If you are purchasing this course, make sure you don't purchase the above courses. Also note, this course is also bundled in comprehensive course named Accounting, Finance and Banking - A Comprehensive Study. So if you are purchasing above course, make sure you don't purchase this course. • Category: Business What's in the Course? 1. Over 346 lectures and 48 hours of content! 2. Understand Basics of Financial Management 3. Understand Importance of Time Value of Money 4. Understand Financial Ratio Analysis 5. Understand Cash Flow Analysis 6. Understand Fund Flow Analysis 7. Understand Cost of Capital 8. Understand Capital Structuring 9. Understand Capital Budgeting Process 10. Understand Working Capital Management 11. Understand Various sources of Finance Course Requirements: 1. Students can approach with fresh mind Who Should Attend? 1. Any one who wants to learn Financial Management comprehensively 2. MBA (Finance) students 3. CA / CMA / CS / CFA / CPA / CIMA
Views: 83251 CARAJACLASSES
How to Calculate WACC, Cost Equity and Debt
 
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For more details, visit: http://www.financewalk.com Estimate WACC-Cost of Equity • WACC = Weighted Average Cost of Capital • A calculation of a firm's cost of capital in which each category of capital is proportionately weighted. All capital sources - common stock, preferred stock, bonds and any other long-term debt - are included in a WACC calculation. • WACC is calculated by multiplying the cost of each capital component by its proportional weight and then summing . • WACC is the combination of Cost of Equity and Cost of Debt with their weightages respectively. • As we know Cost of Equity is calculated by CAPM method. • Cost of Equity = Rf + B (Rm-Rf) Cost of Capital : WACC = E-V x Ke + D-V x Kd x(1-T) Where, Ke = cost of equity Kd = cost of debt E = market value of the firm's equity D = market value of the firm's debt V=E+D E-V = percentage of financing that is equity D-V = percentage of financing that is debt T = corporate tax rate For example, if the market value of a company's equity is Rs.6000 Crore and it has Rs. 4000 crores of debt on its balance sheet, then 60% of its capital is equity and 40% is debt. If the company's cost of equity is 10% and its cost of debt is 7%, then its WACC is: (60% x 10%) + (40% x 7%) = 8.8%
Views: 89130 FinanceWalk
Cost of Capital - Cost of Equity and Retained Earnings
 
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Cost of Capital - Cost of Equity and Retained Earnings
Views: 11732 Michael Holder
FIN 401 - WACC (Cost of Debt) - Ryerson University
 
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LIST OF FIN401 VIDEOS ORGANIZED BY CHAPTER http://www.fin401.ca FIN300 FIN 300 CFIN300 CFIN 300 - Ryerson University FIN401 FIN 401 CFIN401 CFIN 401 - Ryerson University Key Words: MHF4U, Nelson, Advanced Functions, Mcgraw Hill, Grade 12, Toronto, Mississauga, Tutor, Math, Polynomial Functions, Division, Ontario, University, rick hansen secondary school, john fraser secondary school, applewood heights secondary school, greater toronto area, lorne park secondary school, clarkson secondary school, mpm1d, mpm2d, mcr3u, mcv4u, tutoring, university of waterloo, queens university, university of western, york university, university of toronto, finance, uoft, reciprocals, reciprocal of a function, library, bonds, stocks, npv, equity, balance sheet, income statement, liabilities, CCA, cca tax shield, capital cost allowance, finance, managerial finance, fin 300, fin300, fin 401, fin401, irr, profitability index,
Views: 21749 AllThingsMathematics
Weighted Average Cost of Capital (WACC) in 3 Easy Steps: How to Calculate WACC
 
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OMG I'm SHOCKED so easy clicked here http://mbabullshit.com/blog/2011/08/06/wacc-weighted-average-cost-of-capital-how-to-calculate-wacc/ for Weighted Average Cost of Capital or WACC. Cost of capital arises from either cost of debt or cost of equity. It is necessary to discover your cost of capital to make certain you are able to relate it to the rate of return of your business or task. The rate of return of your enterprise or undertaking should be equal to or higher than your cost of capital; so that your venture or task can break-even or raise a profit. If the capital applied for your business comes from borrowing from the financial institution at, say, 5% interest rate, then your cost of capital is 5%. If the capital used for your business is supplied by the private funding of your pal Harry who demands a 10% return on equity, then your cost of capital is 10%. Relatively easy! The difficulty is this: What if the capital of your business comes from a blend of both loaning from the bank and the personal capital of your pal Harry? What will be your cost now? Shall it be 5% (akin to the bank's interest rate) or will it be 10% (similar to Harry's expected return)? I'm pretty sure you can by now judge that logically, it would be something around the 5% and 10%! Thus, what number precisely? It goes without saying, you find it hard to plainly presume it. You need a formula which will provide you the particular percentage in between 5% and 10%. At this point the WACC Formula comes in. It in basic terms and easily provides you an exact percentage immediately after considering a) the cost of debt, b) the cost of equity, c) the extent (or "weight") of your capital which is supplied by debt, d) the balance (or "weight") of your capital which arises from equity, and e) the commercial tax rate in your geographical region. In the event that the WACC formula connects these factors jointly, it will yield you the percent amount in between 5% and 10% that you're in search of... and you'll discover your "precise" cost of capital established on the distinctive proportions or "weights" of how much of your capital comes from either debt or equity. Simplified, the formula looks like this: WACC = (Debt Proportion)(Cost of Debt %)(1 - tax rate %) (Equity Proportion)(Cost of Equity %) Individuals who find it challenging to employ mathematical symbols from sheer written representations can readily find out how they are applied detailed "in action" on quite a few internet based tutoring video websites and sites like YouTube. However, for industrialists and general managers, knowing the detailed operation might not be needed as a consequence of today's large number of cost free online calculators on the internet as well as calculator functions on new scientific calculators or even smartphone apps; which let owners to electronically and instantly come across solutions with the push of a switch. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JKJglPkAJ5o
Views: 459356 MBAbullshitDotCom
Cost of Equity
 
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Calculate the cost of equity using the arithmetic and the geometric growth methods.
Views: 199 Bruce Konners
Weighted Average cost of Capital (WACC) ~ Financial Management for B.Com/M.Com/CA/CS/CMA
 
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In this lecture I have calculated specific cost of capital (i.e. cost of equity, cost of preference share and cost of debt) and also explained 'Weighted Average Cost of Capital'. In later part I have calculated WACC by two alternative methods. 🔴 Download Notes: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0BzfDYffb228JNW9WdVJyQlQ2eHc?usp=sharing 🔴 Connect on Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/ca.naresh.aggarwal 🔴 Connect with Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/+CANareshAggarwal
Views: 20245 CA. Naresh Aggarwal
Cost of Equity Using Security Market Line | Corporate Finance | CPA Exam BEC | CMA Exam | Chp 14 p 2
 
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The security market line (SML) is a line drawn on a chart that serves as a graphical representation of the capital asset pricing model (CAPM), which shows different levels of systematic, or market, risk of various marketable securities plotted against the expected return of the entire market at a given point in time.
Cost of Equity
 
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Views: 4555 MVN University
Cost of Capital - Lecture 2
 
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www.badlanionline.com CA/CS/CMA
Views: 97270 CA dilip badlani
FIN 401 - WACC (Cost of Preferred Equity) - Ryerson University
 
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LIST OF FIN401 VIDEOS ORGANIZED BY CHAPTER http://www.fin401.ca FIN300 FIN 300 CFIN300 CFIN 300 - Ryerson University FIN401 FIN 401 CFIN401 CFIN 401 - Ryerson University Key Words: MHF4U, Nelson, Advanced Functions, Mcgraw Hill, Grade 12, Toronto, Mississauga, Tutor, Math, Polynomial Functions, Division, Ontario, University, rick hansen secondary school, john fraser secondary school, applewood heights secondary school, greater toronto area, lorne park secondary school, clarkson secondary school, mpm1d, mpm2d, mcr3u, mcv4u, tutoring, university of waterloo, queens university, university of western, york university, university of toronto, finance, uoft, reciprocals, reciprocal of a function, library, bonds, stocks, npv, equity, balance sheet, income statement, liabilities, CCA, cca tax shield, capital cost allowance, finance, managerial finance, fin 300, fin300, fin 401, fin401, irr, profitability index,
Views: 5374 AllThingsMathematics
CA Final SFM-Capital Asset Pricing Model by CA Mayank Kothari
 
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Join Telegram "CA Mayank Kothari" https://t.me/joinchat/AAAAAE1xyAre8Jv7G8MAOQ For video lectures visit http://www.conferenza.in Online Lectures @ Superprofs.com Live Batches @ Nagpur.
Views: 69130 CA Mayank Kothari
Cost of Capital - Part 1 of 7 by Vijay Adarsh | Financial Management (FM) | StayLearning | (HINDI)
 
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▶ Cost of Capital In this chapter we will learn A) Cost of Debt B) Cost of Preference Shares C) Cost of Equity D) Cost of Retained Earning E) Combination of cost and weighted of each sources of capital - Weighted Average Cost of Capital (WACC) ▶ Buy Now all Video Lectures - http://www.vijayadarsh.com 🔴 Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/VijayAdarshIndia 🔴 Join us on Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/+VIJAYADARSH 🔴 Website: http://www.vijayadarsh.com 🔴 E-mail: [email protected] 🔴 Contact: +91 9268373738 (Buy Now all Video Lectures) About Video Lectures: Video Lectures for Financial Management(FM) by Vijay Adarsh evolved as utility services for our own students. These are our classroom lectures which form a very good source of study material. LEARN AT YOUR OWN TIME : OWN SPEED : OWN PLACE StayLearning provides video lectures of Accountancy, Micro & Macro Economics, Mathematics, Income Tax, Corporate Accounting, Business Mathematics, Business Statistics, Cost Accounting, Financial Management (FM), for Class 9, 10, 11, 12, B.Com (Hons/Prog) – First Year (FY), Second Year (SY) and Third Year (TY), M.Com, MBA Examination by the best & renowned teachers. The Lectures Covers in full depth, the description of all the involved concepts. Studying through lectures largely reduces the need of individual tuition. Lectures can be use at a pace which suits us. Students can pause and rewind the lectures according to their need. Complete practice tests and solutions of every topic would also be provided. 🔴 Visit Now : http://www.vijayadarsh.com 🔴 Contact: +91 9268373738 (Buy Now all Video Lectures)
Views: 994 StayLearning